Other

United Airlines To Fuel Planes with Food Waste

United Airlines To Fuel Planes with Food Waste


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

United Airlines is embracing alternative fuel to power flights from Los Angeles to San Francisco

United will become the first airline to operate a regular passenger flight using alternative jet fuel

Sometime this summer, United Airlines will become the first airline to operate a regular passenger flight using alternative jet fuel, which is created from farm waste and oils derived from fat, reports The New York Times.

The flight, from Los Angeles to San Francisco, will mark a long-awaited milestone between the airline and biofuel industries.

This innovative new fuel will be composed of 30 percent animal fat and farm waste oil with 70 percent regular fuel. If everything goes according to plan, this alternative fuel will be mixed with United’s overall fuel supply, report the Times.

On June 30, United announced a $30 million investment into Fulcrum Bioenergy, representing the largest investment ever by a domestic airline into the alternative fuel industry.

This push towards alternative fuel should help both the enviroment and United. Fulcrum believes their oil can cut carbon emissions by 80 percent and is cheaper than standard jet fuel according to the Times report.

This is the second such attempt United is making to embrace alternative fuel. In 2013, United bought 15 million gallons of biofuel from AltAir Fuels.

This alternative fuel source may help put the large amount of wasted food in America to better use.


The ridiculous story of airline food and why so much ends up in landfill

You probably know about the waste problem in our oceans. But how about the one in our skies?

Airline passengers generated 5.2m tonnes of waste in 2016, most of which went to landfill or incineration, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) estimates. That’s the weight of about 2.6m cars. And it’s a figure set to double over the next 15 years.

Toilet waste is included in that statistic. But so are miniature wine bottles, half-eaten lunch trays, unused toothbrushes and other hallmarks of air travel.

Once a plane has landed, huge volumes of disposable items are thrown away, says Matt Rance, chief executive of MNH Sustainable Cabin Services, a company that advises airlines on waste reduction. “It’s almost like taking a tube, tipping it upside down, emptying it out and then saying ‘right, fill it up with new stuff again’.”

The airline industry has taken flak for its growing greenhouse gas emissions as passenger numbers rise. But could its massive waste footprint be solved without affecting the sector’s growth?


United Airlines Wants To Fuel Jets With Your Leftover Dinner

Your food scraps could soon be powering your next flight.

United Airlines announced Tuesday that it is investing $30 million in Fulcrum BioEnergy, a California-based company that converts household waste into renewable jet fuel. That means fuel made from food scraps, farm waste and animal fat will be mixed in with traditional fuel. It marks the first time that an American airline will run passenger flights on this technology, The New York Times reports.

The environmental benefits could be huge: Fulcrum anticipates its alternative fuel can reduce an airline's greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent. And it believes it can do this while remaining competitive with traditional fuel companies: CEO E. James Macias told the Times its biofuel could cost "a lot less than" $1 a gallon.

The carbon footprint of flying is pretty serious: Airlines are responsible for around 3 percent of the country's total CO2 emissions. When that's broken down more, it means a round-trip flight from New York to San Francisco produces about 3 tons of CO2 per person. Americans also generate on average nearly double the amount of CO2 that Europeans do.

Food waste is also a major problem, and it's getting worse. The American Chemistry Council recently found that each American household throws away $640 worth of food each year. And food represents one-fifth of landfill waste and contributes significantly to methane, a greenhouse gas, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

An EPA finding last month concluded that airlines' emissions posed a significant health risk, and by 2016 the Obama administration may adopt environmental standards outlined by the United Nations' International Civil Aviation Organization, Reuters reports. Still, the requirement is likely to only apply to planes certified in and after 2020.

United first invested in greener fuel two years ago, when it made a deal with AltAir Fuels to buy 15 million gallons of the producer's biofuels, made from nonedible natural oils and farm waste, over a period of three years.

Around five flights between Los Angeles and San Francisco will run on AltAir biofuel every day, starting later this summer. After two weeks, the fuel will become part of the airline’s general supply. United expects to receive Fulcrum biofuel as early as 2018, spokeswoman Mary Ryan told The Huffington Post.

United and Fulcrum also plan to run up to five locations near United's airport hubs that could produce as much as 180 million gallons of fuel a year.

This article has been updated with comment from United Airlines.


United Airlines To Power Jets With Food Scraps And Animal FatAirline Powers Jets With Food Scraps

For the first time in history, an alternative jet fuel has been cleared for landing.

United Airlines will test out a 70/30 biofuel combination of regular jet fuel and animal fat and farm waste on a flight from Los Angeles to San Francisco. The roughly hour-long flight is set to take off this summer, according to The New York Times. The biofuel will be supplied by AltAir Fuels, from which United bought 15 million gallons over a span of three years.

The company plans on phasing in the biofuel into four or five flights per day for two weeks with plans on integrating the fuel to all flights thereafter. The Times also reports that United will invest $30 million into Fulcrum BioEnergy, one of the largest producers of biofuels for planes.

Not only is this a step forward in terms of decreasing air pollution, but the cost of biofuel is also lower than that of traditional jet fuel: less than $1 per gallon as opposed to the $2.11 United is paying on average.

Southwest Airlines plans on using biofuel made with wood residue by next year, while Alaska Airlines set the goal of using an alternative fuel at one of its airports by 2020.


Making progress overseas

Velocys has set an aim of achieving a final investment decision in 2019, and is currently participating in an initial feasibility stage. One of the biggest challenges will be sourcing additional funding to help bring the plant to fruition, and Hargreaves claims this will involve persuading investors that the processes involved in waste-to-jet fuel have been done before.

“Each of the steps we’re following has been embodied in a commercial plant somewhere else,” says Hargreaves. “It’s a case of knitting them together, and making sure that they all join up correctly so it does operate reliably and produces the amount of fuel required.

“I think getting it financed will involve some innovative mechanisms, some ways of working with the financial communities that are a bit different from the conventional project, and then we just need to build it.”

Nevertheless, success achieved elsewhere could harbour promising prospects for the project. In the US, Fulcrum BioEnergy has made developing waste-to-jet fuel its mission, having received backing from a number of investors to build its Sierra Biofuels Plant in Nevada.

The first phase of the Sierra project was completed in 2016, with the production of a feedstock processing facility next-door to one of the largest landfills in Western US. From 2020, the feedstock produced from the waste will head into the Sierra Biorefinery, where it will be converted into a low-carbon synthetic crude oil, or ‘syncrude’.

Fulcrum claims that Sierra is expected to process 175,000t of feedstock annually, creating 10.5 million gallons of syncrude per year. With around $280m of capital investment going into the project, the company has so far achieved a level of backing that Velocys will hope to match. Countries outside the UK and the US will also be looking to see if this kind of renewable jet fuel is one that is worth supporting.

“I think [the UK Government] has made an important and bold step in taking this on,” Hargreaves says. “It’s difficult in aviation for the obvious reason that if airlines don’t like the regime, they just pick their fuel up from somewhere else, so it’s important that the mechanism is structured in such a way as to make it cost-neutral for the airlines, which is what the present one has done.”

Given that these projects are still in their early stages, it’s unlikely that waste-to-jet fuel will be powering flights worldwide anytime soon. Nevertheless, the increasing number of planes taking off for the first time using biofuel has indicated that airlines are recognising the commercial and environmental benefits of this sort of project.

“I think in the present form, we use a lot of fuel as a society and we’d have to take an awful lot of waste in order to make enough fuel,” says Hargreaves. “I think the simple answer is waste can be an important contributor and it may be the gateway to other things in the future.”


United Airlines To Use Food Scraps For Renewable Jet Fuel

United Airlines is about to be the first American-based airline to use renewable jet fuel made from food scraps. The company has enlisted Fulcrum BioEnergy to turn household waste like food scraps, farm waste, and animal fat into biofuel. Their $30 million investment is a double whammy when it comes to the environment: reducing both greenhouse gas emissions and food waste.

“This partnership underscores United’s efforts to be a leader in alternative fuels as well as our efforts to lead commercial aviation as an environmentally responsible company,” said United’s Managing Director for Environmental Affairs and Sustainability Angela Foster-Rice in a statement. “From our carbon offset program to our fuel saving winglet technology, this investment in Fulcrum represents yet another example of our Eco-Skies commitment to a more sustainable future.”

Fulcrum uses a thermochemical process to convert household waste into low cost, low carbon transportation fuels. The process uses heat and pressure to breakdown the biomass and use the component parts for fuel. The biofuel will reduce airline emissions by a reported 80 percent while at the same time, it helps to combat another major problem: food waste. Plus the biofuel is cheap, costing just $1 per gallon.

The carbon footprint of flying is pretty serious: Airlines are responsible for around 3 percent of the country’s total CO2 emissions. When that’s broken down more, it means a round-trip flight from New York to San Francisco produces about 3 tons of CO2 per person. Americans also generate on average nearly double the amount of CO2 that Europeans do.

About 40 percent of food in the U.S. ends up in the nation’s already stressed landfills. That equals to about 20 pounds of food waste per person per month. In all, Americans throw away about $165 billion worth of food every year. This is another great way to put some of that food waste to work for us in the form of jet fuel.

“We know alternative fuels is an emerging industry that is vital to the future of aviation and this is just one of our initiatives to help make these fuels saleable and scalable,” said United’s Executive Vice President and General Counsel Brett Hart. “Investing in alternative fuels is not only good for the environment, it’s a smart move for our company as biofuels have the potential to hedge against future oil price volatility and carbon regulations.”


United Airlines unveils bid to fund sustainable aviation fuel use

United Airlines said on Tuesday it has partnered with global firms including Nike and Siemens in an ⟬o-Skies Alliance' to finance use this year of about 3.4 million gallons of low-carbon, sustainable aviation fuel derived from trash.

Though tiny compared with the 4.3 billion gallons of jet fuel that United consumed in 2019 prior to the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, the amount triples the roughly 1 million gallons of sustainable fuel it has used each year since 2016.

Airlines have used sustainable fuel since 2008 as part of efforts to reduce outright emissions, but so far this represents barely 1% of the fuel used worldwide, industry groups say.

Chicago-based United did not disclose the cost of the plan, nor how much its 11 partners would contribute. It said the project gives customers a way to help reduce the environmental impact of flying beyond buying carbon offsets.

Air transport accounts for 2%-3% of greenhouse gas emissions, the French aerospace association said on Tuesday. Environmental groups argue the sector's overall contribution is higher.

United Chief Executive Scott Kirby said part of the aim of the alliance was to create more of a market for sustainable aviation fuels.

"We'll see how it develops," he told reporters. "I think there's a huge appetite for it."

Partners include companies with corporate or cargo deals with United, like Nike, Palantir, Siemens and Japan's Takeda Pharmaceutical.

The airline industry has focused more broadly on the purchase of carbon offsets to reduce the environmental impact of flying, pending the arrival of new technology to meet the sector's goal of halving net emissions by 2050 versus 2005.

Environmental critics say offsets do not directly address climate goals and mask the problem of ongoing jet emissions.

United, which along with some other carriers has said it wants to cut net emissions more aggressively by 100% by 2050, has criticized offsets and announced a recent investment in ⟊rbon-capture' technology. It has invested in a sustainable aviation fuel producer called Fulcrum BioEnergy.

"While we know that aircraft are never going to be completely decarbonized, we are not going to use offsets as the way to get to 100% green," Kirby said.

Airline association IATA says lifecycle greenhouse emissions from sustainable fuel can be at least 80% lower than normal fuel and are the only medium-term option for curbing emissions growth, since airlines cannot yet switch to electric planes.

While using waste avoids taking land from food production, environmental groups like Transport & Environment say such supplies are limited and face competition from other sectors.


United Airlines To Fuel Planes with Food Waste - Recipes

Creating a sustainable human age we actually want to live in.

Welcome to the Anthropocene

Join thousands of researchers, policymakers, designers, and educators who rely on Anthropocene to keep up to date on the latest sustainability science and innovations.

In their efforts to reduce carbon emissions, some airlines and aircraft makers are pivoting towards biofuels to power airplanes. But jet fuel made from wasted food could slash emissions from flying much more dramatically, researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In the paper, they detail a way to convert organic waste into paraffin, a kerosene-like fuel that can be used in jet engines. Such food waste-derived fuel could cut aviation emission levels by 165 percent compared to fossil fuels.

The aviation industry produces about 2.5 percent of global carbon emissions. Some airlines have recently committed to reduce their carbon footprint by half before 2050. Hybrid and electric airplanes are one way to do that, but biofuels are a more near-term solution. Boeing, for instance, plans to make commercial airplanes that can fly solely on biofuels by 2030. United Airlines is already powering some of its flights with a biofuel blend, which the company says reduces greenhouse gas emissions by over 60 percent.

Until now, sustainable aviation fuel in the U.S. has been produced from virgin vegetable oils or waste fats and oils. But using food waste achieves two goals: it gives a cleaner fuel, and also diverts organic matter from the landfill, avoiding the methane emissions created as it sits and rots. Plus you could also potentially use other wastes like wastewater sludge and manure.

The challenge is that the high water content in this wet waste makes it difficult to process using traditional methods used to make biofuels. So the team led by researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a technique to interrupt the fermentation process of the organic matter into methane.

The process generates acids that have either short chains of carbon atoms or long ones. Petroleum is used today to make such short-chain acids, while the long-chain acids are made from coconut and palm oil.

Next, the researchers used a process called ketonization to convert the acids into paraffins that are identical to those found in petroleum. They were also able to make a slightly different type of paraffin called isoparaffin, which has a much lower freezing point for jet fuel applications, and produces less soot.

A cost analysis showed that the fuel could be produced for a minimum selling price of $2.50 per gallon. The researchers say that this conversion process has the potential to replace 20 percent of the U.S.’s jet fuel consumption, providing a path towards net-zero carbon emissions aviation fuel.

Source: Nabila A. Huq et al. Toward net-zero sustainable aviation fuel with wet waste–derived volatile fatty acids. PNAS, 2021.


United Airlines announces alliance for sustainable jet fuel made from trash

United Airlines said on Tuesday it has partnered with global firms including Nike and Siemens in an "Eco-Skies Alliance" to finance use this year of about 3.4 million gallons of low-carbon, sustainable aviation fuel derived from trash.

Though tiny compared with the 4.3 billion gallons of jet fuel that United consumed in 2019 prior to the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the amount triples the roughly 1 million gallons of sustainable fuel it has used each year since 2016.

Airlines have used sustainable fuel since 2008 as part of efforts to reduce outright emissions, but so far this represents barely 1% of the fuel used worldwide, industry groups say.

Chicago-based United named 11 of more than a dozen global partners for the plan but did not disclose the cost, or how much each would contribute.

Air transport accounts for 2%-3% of greenhouse gas emissions, the French aerospace association said on Tuesday. Environmental groups argue the sector's overall contribution is higher.

Partners include companies with corporate or cargo deals with United, like Nike, Siemens, Palantir and Japan's Takeda Pharmaceutical Co.

United said the project gives customers a way to help reduce the environmental impact of flying beyond buying carbon offsets and could help create more of a market for sustainable aviation fuels.

"We'll see how it develops," Chief Executive Scott Kirby told reporters. "I think there's a huge appetite for it."

The airline industry has focused more broadly on the purchase of carbon offsets to reduce the environmental impact of flying, pending the arrival of new technology to meet the sector's goal of halving net emissions by 2050 versus 2005.

Environmental critics say offsets do not directly address climate goals and mask the problem of ongoing jet emissions.

United, which along with some other carriers has said it wants to cut net emissions more aggressively by 100% by 2050, has criticized offsets and announced a recent investment in "carbon-capture" technology. It has invested in a sustainable aviation fuel producer called Fulcrum BioEnergy.

"While we know that aircraft are never going to be completely decarbonized, we are not going to use offsets as the way to get to 100% green," Kirby said.

Airline association IATA says life cycle greenhouse emissions from sustainable fuel can be at least 80% lower than normal fuel and are the only medium-term option for curbing emissions growth, since airlines cannot yet switch to electric planes.

Delta Air Lines has said it plans to replace 10% of its jet fuel, currently refined from fossil fuel, with sustainable aviation fuel by the end of 2030.

While using waste avoids taking land from food production, environmental groups like Transport & Environment say such supplies are limited and face competition from other sectors.


Discarded Plastic And Uneaten Food: The Shameful Story Of Waste On Planes

Boarding a plane, you settle into a seat, perhaps pulling a blanket and pillow from plastic wrapping to get more comfortable. You take the flimsy plastic headphones offered by the flight attendant, accept some juice in a plastic bottle, with a plastic glass and stirrer, and settle in to pick at the in-flight meal, arranged in an assortment of plastic containers, using the plastic cutlery you’ve unwrapped from its plastic packet.

It’s a familiar scene for those who fly, especially on long-haul flights, and it’s a big environmental problem.

“The sheer amount of waste that comes from inside the planes is staggering,” says David (not his real name), a flight attendant for a regional carrier owned by American Airlines. “Plastic cups, cans and boxed juices, some of them opened and maybe one cup poured from them then thrown out, plastic wrappers for snacks, cocktail straws, napkins . and none of it recycled,” he tells HuffPost. “This all comes on top of the environmental impact the flight alone has.”

As more people are becoming aware of aviation’s intensive carbon footprint ― it’s responsible for 2% of global human-caused carbon emissions ― a growing number have started to question whether they should be flying at all. The “flight shame” movement, bubbling up from the Nordic countries, is gaining strength across the world as it becomes more common for people to say they are cutting back on flying, with some quitting altogether.

But even as flygskam (Swedish for flight shame) becomes a recognisable term, global passenger numbers are not falling. Around 4.3 billion passengers flew in 2018, up 6.1% from the previous year, and around 4.5 billion passengers flew in 2019. Passenger numbers will nearly double by 2037, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) predicts.

And as more people fly, the sheer scale of the waste they produce on board is becoming its own environmental disaster.

In 2018, airlines generated around 6.7 million tons of cabin waste according to IATA. A study at London’s Heathrow Airport in 2012 and 2013 found the average passenger generated 3.1 pounds of waste across long- and short-haul flights.

Plastic is a big part of this waste stream, and a staggering problem globally. Only around 9% of the 6.3 billion metric tons of plastic waste we have produced has been recycled. Plastic waste pollutes our water, air and food, and has been found everywhere from the deepest parts of the ocean, to pristine mountain air, to a whale’s stomach.

There’s also food waste. Between 20% to 30% of the total waste is untouched food and drink, according to IATA. The remnants of a plane load of people’s unappetising onboard meals pretty much always goes the same way as everything else: into the trash cart, destined for landfill or incineration.

“That’s the upsetting part about flying,” Megan Epler Wood, director of the International Sustainable Tourism Initiative at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, tells HuffPost ― appropriately enough from a layover in Miami. “They’re just throwing everything into one bag. And there’s no effort to separate, which means you know they’re not recycling because they can’t. Once the plastic or anything else becomes contaminated, it can’t be recycled.”

People often overlook the fact that waste is also a climate issue, says Epler Wood, pointing to the emissions it takes to produce the plastic, food and other items that end up as cabin waste. “All of that has actually not been factored in to the overall question of how much greenhouse gas is being emitted [when flying].”

“In training we asked about recycling and were laughed at.”

David says despite being an employee on the front line of this waste, even bringing it up with his employer is hard. “In training we asked about recycling and were laughed at, probably because of the pressure we have as flight attendants to turn these flights around so quickly. How do I have time to recycle when I have 27 minutes to get everyone off and the next flight boarded?”

Airlines are trying to make changes. But it’s slow.

Some airlines are taking steps to tackle the onboard waste problem. Australian carrier Qantas launched what it claimed was the first “zero waste” commercial flight in May 2019, between Sydney and Adelaide. All the waste produced onboard was either recycled, reused or composted. Plastic items were swapped out for reusable or compostable materials and stewards separated all the waste they collected.

In Europe, Air France has pledged to cut out 210 million pieces of plastic (such as cutlery, cups and drink stirrers) used on flights and to eliminate 1,300 tons of single-use plastics annually. Plastic products will be swapped out for alternatives including paper cups, bio-based cutlery and wooden stirrers. And, with European Union financing, Spanish airline Iberia co-launched the Zero Cabin Waste project aiming to recover 80% of the waste generated in flight cabins. As part of that, last May the airline brought in more than 500 trolleys with compartments to allow waste to be collected separately.

In the U.S., Alaska Airlines has pledged to reduce the in-flight waste per passenger going to landfill by 70% by 2020. On June 5, 2019, United Airlines flew what it called “the most eco-friendly commercial flight of its kind in the history of aviation,” which included zero cabin waste . And JetBlue has initiated an onboard recycling program to sort and recycle bottles and cans served on domestic flights.

A spokesperson for American Airlines, which owns the carrier David works for, told HuffPost it has had an aluminium recycling plan since 1989 and that “we have eliminated all plastic straws, instead offering a stir stick made of sustainable, environmentally friendly bamboo.” The airline says it’s currently looking for other cost-neutral biodegradable materials.

But many of the moves are slow and ad hoc, in no small part because plastic has the advantage of being both light and cheap.

There’s a strong demand from airlines for new materials, says Jon Godson, the assistant director for environment best practices at IATA, but finding them is far from simple.

London-based design company PriestmanGoode, which has been working with the aviation sector for two decades, has designed an economy meal tray out of edible, biodegradable and compostable materials such as coffee grounds, algae, bamboo and rice husk.

“The idea is to show that there are alternatives that we can explore,” Anna Meyer, the company’s head of communications, says of the concept design currently on display at the London Design Museum. But, she says, “the reality is there isn’t a simple solution, there isn’t a single material that can replace everything.”

It would be best not to have disposable items at all, says Godson, but materials like glass and metal cutlery, for example, are heavier, meaning a plane will burn more fuel and emit more carbon dioxide. They would also require washing which means detergents and possibly more pollution. “We want to ensure that the sustainability benefits [of any replacement materials] are proven,” Godson says.

It’s not just a problem for airlines to solve

To make a real difference, the systems also need to be in place for dealing with these waste flows, whatever the material. That means it’s not just about what happens on airplanes, but what happens at airports.

“It’s really up to the airports, because if the airlines have nowhere to put the waste, there is almost nothing they can do,” Epler Wood noted.

And it’s a very mixed bag when it comes to airports’ progress on waste. “San Francisco has done the best job,” she says. “They have a zero-waste policy that’s been in place longer than other airports and have the facilities in place to make sure they’re lowering the waste.” The airport aims to be the world’s first zero-waste airport by 2021 . This will mean diverting 90% of waste from landfill and incineration by using materials that can be recycled or composted.

She also cites Hong Kong, which has pledged to be the greenest airport in the world. The airport has an on-site anaerobic food digester which can convert food waste to energy. It has also implemented a series of measures aimed at reducing cabin waste including conducting in-flight waste separation trials.

Regulation, however, can present a big obstacle. Some countries, especially those with a big agricultural sector including the U.S. and the U.K., treat waste coming in from international flights as hazardous and mandate that it be incinerated or buried deep in landfills. The aim is to prevent the spread of diseases affecting animals.

IATA has warned that without better regulation, cabin waste levels could double over the next decade .

“There’s a strong incentive for us to reduce the waste in the first place,” says Godson. “I think that’s critical. But when it comes to reuse and recycling, then we smack straight into animal health regulations around the world.” It’s often easiest to classify everything on the flight as hazardous, he adds.

“We’ve seen many airlines that have replaced single-use plastics, with more sustainable solutions such as bamboo, paper, cardboard cutlery, the whole variety of different biodegradable options, only to see that material incinerated on landing.”

Individuals can reduce their waste — but we can’t solve this crisis

Is there anything can individuals do? We can bring reusable water bottles, coffee cups and even utensils with us. IATA recommends not putting waste in seat pockets, refusing food and beverages you know you don’t want and pre-ordering meals when possible.

David even had one passenger who took her own bottles off the plane so she could recycle them ― but, he says, she is very much in the minority . “When people come on those planes, they do not think about the trash that they generate, and when you look at the conditions the cabin is left in when people get off the plane … trash is all over the floor, shoved into the pockets, and they don’t think about it.”

There’s plenty of academic evidence that people who recycle at home don’t even think to do it when they travel, says Epler Wood. “And I see that all the time … even with what I would call highly enlightened citizens.”

Regardless, individual actions can’t solve what is a systemic problem requiring systemic answers. “We’re stuck in a system where we are going to take the aircraft that suits our needs for our particular trip. And we’re going to use the airport that we need to use,” says Epler Wood.

David says, as things are, he feels powerless and desperately hopes that if more people are aware of the problem of cabin waste, airlines might be pushed to do more.

“Planes are not going away, and taking a flight is one of the largest contributors to a person’s carbon footprint. Recycling and reducing the amount of plastics on the planes would help reduce that footprint for every passenger on board. I know it would help me feel a little less bad for just passing the trash along knowing it will just end up in a landfill.”

For more content and to be part of the “This New World” community, follow our Facebook page.


Watch the video: Γ. Tσιρώνης: Τα απορρίμματα εμπεριέχουν σημαντικό πλούτο με διπλή αξία (May 2022).