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12 Recipes to Get Your Basil Fix


1. Pineapple-Basil Agua Fresca

Photo by Elizabeth Layman

Sweet, tangy and refreshing? This agua fresca pairs pineapple with basil like a boss.

2. Pesto

Photo by Julie Maguire

This pasta topping will taste from-the-garden fresh, especially since it calls for 2 whole cups of basil.

3. Fancified Lunchables

Photo by Katherine Baker

This Lunchable hack takes a classy turn with sprigs of basil on top.

4. Avocado, Basil and Bacon Ice Cream

Photo by Hannah Lin

This savory and aromatic dessert will catch any basil skeptic’s attention.

5. Spaghetti Sauce Simplicity

Photo by Judy Holtz

This mash-up of ingredients doesn’t skimp on basil or oregano in order to perfect the classic spaghetti sauce.

6. Watermelon and Ricotta Salad

Photo by Megan Prendergast

Basil leaves were the only greens spared in “Leave Out the Leaves.” This watermelon salad recipe with basil is a must.

7. Meatball Sliders

Photo by Ben Abrahams

Sub lettuce with a basil leaf for these pop-in-your-mouth meatball sliders.

8. Fried Cheese Sandwich

Photo by Heather Harris

Have your own Euro-trip without leaving US turf with this fried sandwich, topped with garlicky herb and lemon mayonnaise infused with basil.

9. Strawberry Peach Guacamole

Photo by Natalie Cantave

Though the classic guacamole recipe has a soft spot in our hearts, we aren’t impartial to testing this guac mixed with strawberry, peaches and some chopped fresh basil.

10. Healthy Pesto Garlic Pasta

Photo by Parisa Soraya

Nutrient-dense and light on oil and cheese, this update offers a lighter take on a favorite pasta sauce.

11. Cucumber, Avocado & Tomato Salad

Photo by Maggie Gorman

The fresh basil leaves may be “optional” in this salad, but we say toss in the fresh leaves for an extra punch of flavor.

12. Mediterranean Pita Pizzas

Photo by Elyse Belarge

Simple as can be, these pita pizzas are topped with feta, olives, basil and classic tomato sauce, so you can eat like a Greek without paying crazy airfare.

The post 12 Recipes to Get Your Basil Fix appeared first on Spoon University.


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."


Boost Your Iron With These 12 Delicious Recipes

Iron in our diets is something we often forget about in favour of antioxidants, superfoods and strange ingredients which promise superlative health.

We get it, iron isn't a sexy mineral by any means, and frankly, it reminds us of (failing) high school chemistry.

But it is important, and luckily you can boost your iron in ways that are very easy and delicious. Promise.

"Iron is an essential mineral which helps to make red blood cells, and red blood cells help to carry oxygen around the body," accredited practising dietitian Joel Feren told The Huffington Post Australia.

"Iron deficiency can cause things like fatigue, general tiredness, weakness, dizziness and decreased immunity. Pale skin is another symptom.

"Some groups of people are more at risk of iron deficiency -- athletes, teenage girls, woman in general (due to regular menstrual blood loss), toddlers and babies."

There are two types of iron people can consume, and it's important to know the difference.

"Heme iron is derived from animal sources, and nonheme is vegetarian," Feren explained.

"There's a slight difference in its chemical structure. Heme sources of iron are more bioavailable and are better absorbed by the body. Nonheme sources aren't as bioavailable. It's actually dependent on some vitamin C, which helps to convert the nonheme iron into a more bioavailable form."

While having a small glass of orange juice with your vegetarian sources of iron helps, Feren recommends including whole sources of vitamin C rich foods, such as fruit, vegetables and legumes.

"I try not to encourage too much juice, but certainly combining iron sources with whole vitamin C rich foods like vegetables and fruit," Feren said.

"Fruit can work really well in salads. Even things like lemon juice and zest, and lime juice and zest are great to add to dishes."

Sources of iron

  • Your best sources of iron are meat, particularly red meat, so things like kangaroo, lamb and beef.
  • Good sources of iron include legumes, beans and dried fruit. Tofu is also a wonderful source of iron.
  • Okay sources of iron are green leafy veggies (spinach, kale, brussels sprouts, silverbeet, etc.), nuts, seeds, tahini, dried fruit and eggs.

"Kangaroo is incredibly lean and it's also a fantastic source of iron. Kangaroo steaks on the barbie, roast lamb or beef steaks are great," Feren said.

Chicken and fish also contain some iron, so we certainly don't have to exclude those.

"The recommendation of red meat are 3-4 serves a week, but that doesn't mean you need a slab of meat on your plate. It's about being mindful of getting that balance right and including the veggies and salad."

Whether you're vegetarian or not, Feren recommends including legumes and tofu in your diet.

"I think that's one that often gets overlooked. Tofu is incredibly versatile," Feren told HuffPost Australia.

"Think of barbecues in summer, rather than chucking on snags, steaks and chops, try some marinated tofu. The beauty of tofu is that it takes on the flavour of whatever you're cooking with it. Then you can try things like tempeh.

"I'm big on things like legumes and beans. They are so versatile -- you can use them in stir frys, salads and soup."